Uphilldowndale

Watching nature take its course, from the top of a hill in northern England


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Spud on Sunday Part XXXXVIII

Spud the dog and I went down the field this morning, to investigate what looked from the bedroom window to be a very strange shaped molehill.

What we found was  indeed, a very strange shaped molehill, the evidence of this could easily have been flattened by Spud before I got anywhere near it with the camera (see below)

Strange molehill and Spud the dog-1 

It is I think you will agree very strange indeed.

Strange molehill-1

When I said I was looking forward to photographing a more ‘sculptural’ landscape, this wasn’t what I had in mind… We’ve had many mole tales here before.

 


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Not So Freshly Pressed

Uphilldowndale, One Thousand Posts Later

This is post number 1,000, I’m finding it hard to believe, but there you go, the nice people at WordPress kindly provide a behind the scenes (or screen) page of statistics about my blog and the little counter at the bottom of the page says my previous post was  number 999 and  as I can’t recall ever deleting any of my posts this must be it.

I thought I’d dish up a favourite post, but I couldn’t decide, I couldn’t even decide on a photo (some of my favourite blog photos are huddled together on my flickr page). In the end I settled for this little chap, who fledged from a nest in the barn wall back in June 2008, (maybe its how I felt when I first started the blog, it was a bit of a leap into the unknown)

Little bird 2

Tonight  is a double celebration as I also pressed the send key, and dispatched the last piece of work for my course of study, off into cyberspace. Woooohoooo; me time beckons, the hills are a calling, time to get out and play.

Thank you all for stopping by and taking the time to comment, it wouldn’t be the same without you xx.


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97% of Islanders Won’t Be Wrong

The Isle of Eigg Says No to Fish Farm

The Isle of Eigg off the west coast of Scotland, has a special place in the heart of this family. I’ve been there a number of  times, I’ve had the privilege of watching otters, golden eagles, seals and pods of porpoise, going about their business. It is a magical place and the people who live there care about it passionately

 OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

If the residents of Eigg say no to the proposal to site a fish farm of the coast of the island, it will be for good reason.

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Opposition to a Fish Farm on the Isle of Eigg

Eigg is owned and managed (including the foreshore) by the Isle of Eigg Heritage Trust, a community led organisation whose aims include taking all appropriate measures to conserve the natural heritage of the island for the benefit of the community & the wider general public.

To this end Eigg is building a reputation as a green island working towards sustainability. Visitors come to the island to learn from our experience and to enjoy the natural and cultural heritage of the island and the peace and quiet. Most of the islands electricity is generated by renewable technology and the sound of diesel generators is but a distant memory.

Highland Council has recently received an initial application to site a fish farm off the east coast of Eigg, north of Kildonan. The site identified covers an area extending to 20ha (this equates to 28 football pitches) & would consist of 14 x 30m diameter cages which would be serviced by a 10m x 10m permanently sited barge (powered by diesel generator).

The community has considered this proposal at length. The outcome of the resulting ballot which had an 86% turnout was 97% against the development.

Eigg lies within the Small Isles National Scenic Area. A large fish farm would have a considerable negative impact on the approach to the island and could also impact negatively on the peace and quiet that visitors seek when they come to the island, as well as on the quality of life of nearby residents.

Laig Panorama

Be a good Eigg, and pop along and sign the on line petition (and you can find some more photos of Eigg here, just a few, sadly I’ve not been up to Eigg since I got into the digital camera lark, I’m sure there would be 100’s and 100’s of images if I went now)

P5311697


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Rising Tide

All Washed Up

Back to Suffolk and Snape Maltings, another dash of art, a site specific art work by Fran Crowe, in the Dovecote Studio. The building itsself reminds me of a budding daffodil bulb (I’m sorry it’s been an odd sort of day, but trust me this post will get yet more obscure.)

Dovecote Snape Maltings-1

Fran’s work is made from what ever she finds washed up on the Suffolk Shore

Which on the plus side is colourful, the negative being, well see for yourself

Dovecote Snape Maltings 1-1 Dovecote Snape Maltings 2-1Dovecote Snape Maltings 3-1

Not good is it?

The other thing I found  out on her ‘silly but serious’ website is that Fran is interested in moles, and their role in fighting the rising tide of sea level change due to global warming. Now this blog has a fondness for moles, they tend to be more dead than alive when they make an appearance, but that is more to do with the fact they are subterranean little mammals and camera shy. Fran’s initiative is called Up and Under the gist of it is (as far as I can make out)  that we should cultivate moles and that then should water levels rise, the mole tunnels will act as drainage channels, but sadly the mole will drown.

Now I have to say I think Fran’s plan may be site specific, that as I live at the top of a hill in Derbyshire, if the moles in our field find their tunnels awash with sea water, they, the nation, if not the world is totally stuffed. Not good is it?

Mummified Mole


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The Sting in the Tale

Down by the compost heap something caught my eye, a patch of nettles that from a distance  looked as though it was covered in black pea pod sort of things; further investigations revealed these beauties, as black as Whitby jet

Peacock -1

I think they are the caterpillars of peacock butterflies,  but of course what we really need is a butterfly man, remember him and his beautiful illustrations?

There are hundreds of caterpillars out there, Joe says there are so many, they may eat the house during the night (he has inherited his mothers over active imagination, poor lad, either that or he has been on strange PC games again).

Peacock 2-1

They seemed to be emerging from places like this

Peacock butterfly -1

Dressed in cropped trousers and sandals, I wasn’t for getting any further into the nettle patch, this is as close as it gets.

Peacock 4-1


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Caught in the Act

I can’t wait to get out and about, it seems like an age since I’ve had opportunity to meander with the camera.

Footpath -1

Not long now and I’ll be set free.

I’ve been a bit concerned that I’d not seen any buzzards around her of of late, in the winter I was seeing or hearing them daily (I’ve only been seeing them around here since 2008 I think). I hoped they had moved on to better hunting rather than come to any harm and I’m pleased to say I saw one across the valley at the weekend, so all looks well.

just hills and stuff-1

 

However, over in  the Derwent valley, thing have not been so good for birds of prey, a gamekeeper has been ordered to pay costs £10,000 and given a community service order for  illegal trapping

A Derbyshire gamekeeper has been found guilty of attempting to illegally trap and kill birds of prey, following a 10-day trial.

Glenn Brown was convicted at Chesterfield Magistrates Court today of seven offences under the Countryside and Wildlife Act 1981, relating to the unlawful use of a cage trap on a grouse shooting estate on the Upper Derwent Valley. He was sentenced to 100 hours community service and ordered to pay £10,000 costs

The RSPB set up a covert camera operation and caught him red handed.

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