Uphilldowndale

Watching nature take its course, from the top of a hill in northern England

Daily Bread

4 Comments

Continuing our journey along Ireland’s Wild Atlantic Way

Altar church

Altar Church, beside Toormore Bay on the Mizen Peninsula, near Ireland’s southernmost point, is also known as Teampol na mBocht, the Church of the Poor.

It was built in 1847, at the height of the Great Famine.

Before we set off on our journey, knew a little about Ireland’s Great Famine, we knew a little, but we didn’t comprehend its enormity nor its horror.

This church was built, to provide work for the starving.

During Black ’47, The Illustrated London News reported that in the village of Schull, five miles from Toormore, an average of 25 men, women and children were dying every day of starvation, dysentery or famine fever.  At nearby Cove, the population fell from 254 in 1841 to 53 in 1851.

 

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Author: uphilldowndale

Watching the rhythm of rural life, from the top of a hill in northern England. Having spent most of my life avoiding writing, I now need to do it! I am no domestic goddess, but if I were expecting visitors to my home, I would whisk round with the duster and plump up the cushions and generally make the place look presentable. I hope that by putting my words where others may see them it will encourage me to ‘tidy up and push the Hoover around’ my writing. On the other hand I may just be adding to the compost heap. Only time will tell! Pull up a chair, sit yourself down, I’ll put the kettle on.

4 thoughts on “Daily Bread

  1. And made all the worse by the fact the Ireland was exporting food during the famine or so I believe.

  2. It was a terrible time. My ancestors — Deyarmons and Crowleys — emigrated from Ireland prior to the famine: David Deyarmon from County Down in 1771 (or 1776, depending on the record you believe). Still, there was correspondence, and a horror among those living here at what was happening there. So much grief.

  3. Interesting post and picture. I like the header picture. xx

  4. Pingback: Skibbereen | Uphilldowndale

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