Uphilldowndale

Watching nature take its course, from the top of a hill in northern England

Riparian

3 Comments

Where the peaty brown river meets the sea.

Barra river meets sea

Where the water flowing from the flanks of Beinn Mhartainn, on Barra, meets the sea.  I thought there must be a special word , for when a river meets the sea, but I could only find estuary, which just didn’t seem to capture the moment, so I’ve gone with riparian, which means located by the banks of a river , stream or other body of water.  (Is this where ‘rip tides’ come from?)

Barra river meets sea 2

I’m sure that this rich mahogany coloured water is the kind of thing that must enhance the flavour of whiskey? But I can only find references to the use of peat in the process of distilling whiskey, not the water that goes into it..

Mr Uphilldowndale took to rock hopping, and pretending to make a beach landing.  Spud the dog and I kept our feet and the camera kit dry.

Island hopping Barra

 

 

Author: uphilldowndale

Watching the rhythm of rural life, from the top of a hill in northern England. Having spent most of my life avoiding writing, I now need to do it! I am no domestic goddess, but if I were expecting visitors to my home, I would whisk round with the duster and plump up the cushions and generally make the place look presentable. I hope that by putting my words where others may see them it will encourage me to ‘tidy up and push the Hoover around’ my writing. On the other hand I may just be adding to the compost heap. Only time will tell! Pull up a chair, sit yourself down, I’ll put the kettle on.

3 thoughts on “Riparian

  1. Riparian refers only to the banks of a stream (river, slough, creek, etc.) or to adjacent land areas: e.g., a riparian forest. Here, the term that’s commonly used is “tide line.” There may be a scientific phrase I don’t know about, of course. We do have the same sort of situation. Galveston Bay is shallow and muddy, and the rivers that feed it are even more muddy. The Gulf of Mexico waters, offshore, range from green to blue, depending on conditions. The back and forth motions of the tides mean that, occasionally, Gulf waters move into the bay and the water’s clear for a time. In other circumstances, particularly floods, the water flowing from the rivers goes into the Gulf, and the line between the muddy waters and the clear is as distinct as can be.

    Here’s a photo of a tide line where the Mississippi River meets the Gulf off New Orleans.

  2. Wonderful pictures. xx

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