Uphilldowndale

Watching nature take its course, from the top of a hill in northern England

Crab apple way

9 Comments

A few nights away in Cumbria, nr Ullswater, at one of our favourite sites, The Quiet Site (not sure why I’m telling you about it, every one will want to go, what with it’s swishy new zero waste shop an’ all   In the morning Mr Uphilldowndale had been charging around the hills on his bike, I put the kettle on to boil, to sustain my needs for tea and curled up under the duvet with a book, what a treat. Spud the dog snoozed contentedly.  In the afternoon we took a gentle walk along a track near the site, whilst the surface has been sealed at some time it looked little used by traffic.

Apple walk 3

We were surprised by the number and variety of crab apple trees we passed. I know that south Cubria is famed for its damsons, in fact the Westmorland Damson Association, celebrates them in every way.  

But I’d not seen so many apples before, It must look very pretty when they are in bloom, and a source of food for wildlife through the seasons.

Apple walk 8

They are hardy looking trees, that don’t give up when they are down

Apple walk 2

So many colours, bronze green

Apple walk 13

acid greens,

Apple walk

honeyed yellows

Apple walk 4

rusty red

Apple walk 10

rich plum shades

Apple walk 7

We don’t see crab apples in our hedgerows here in north Derbyshire, I tried asking a local, about how come there are so many varieties in just a mile or so of track, they weren’t very forth coming.

Apple walk 5

They can hardly have germinated from an apple cast aside by a passing car or (cart) can they?

The trees arising from discarded cores are genuine wildings, each one unique and with the potential to contribute their characteristics back into the apple gene pool, 

 

The apples had out paced the blackberries, the devil had seen to that.

Apple walk 6

Spud the dog usually like to bring home an apple or two, but these seem to have been a little too tart of his tastes.

Apple walk 12

 

 

 

 

 

Author: uphilldowndale

Watching the rhythm of rural life, from the top of a hill in northern England. Having spent most of my life avoiding writing, I now need to do it! I am no domestic goddess, but if I were expecting visitors to my home, I would whisk round with the duster and plump up the cushions and generally make the place look presentable. I hope that by putting my words where others may see them it will encourage me to ‘tidy up and push the Hoover around’ my writing. On the other hand I may just be adding to the compost heap. Only time will tell! Pull up a chair, sit yourself down, I’ll put the kettle on.

9 thoughts on “Crab apple way

  1. It has been a good year for crab apples here too but we don’t have anything like that variety.

  2. The only thing I can remember being made from our crabapples were spiced ones — or perhaps some jelly. They were entirely too tart to eat, although they made fine weapons in our neighborhood “wars” during grade school.

  3. Good to see that you enjoyed a few days away . I didn’t realise that there were lots of different crab apple varieties, although I’m not surprised thinking about it. It’s a shame that they’re too tart to eat. That local looks like they’re giving you the cold shoulder. xx

  4. I do like Wast Water, lovely screes. I love the Lakes but by the time I have driven up from the South it seems best to carry on to Scotland. I first visited as a teenager more than 40 years ago, then there were less people around.

    • The north of the lakes is much quieter, but yess, there are so many more people, as far as Scotland goes, Skye has a particular problem now the Skye bridge makes is so much easier for visitors to drive there.

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