Uphilldowndale

Watching nature take its course, from the top of a hill in northern England


9 Comments

Round Up of Norfolk

A final  photo selection from our foray into Norfolk

In Blakeney narrow  streets, from an era when boats ruled the world not motorcars,

cottages_

And when catching the tide was more important than catching the bus.

cottages 2

 

A rather fetching wall plaque, with a meandering hollyhock, it has a art deco vibe, do you think?

 

ship plaque art deco-

The admirable 14th century craftsmanship of the ribbed brick vaulting in  Blakeney Guildhall

Blakeney

Some very pretty little costal flowers,can anyone tell me what they are?

costal flowers_

The RNLI station at Wells Wells lifeboat station

Then off down the coast to Cromer

Cromer lifeguard_

Cromer Pier

Cromer pier_

The sort of seaside vista, familiar from my childhood*

Cromer 2

Although it was always the west coast, Lytham St Annes and Fleetwood for my family, but never Blackpool, considered too vulgar… even in the 1960’s

Cromer pier 2

 

Time for home.

 

*Although I always hankered for a seaside holiday with rock pools, so I could complete my I Spy the Seashore book.


5 Comments

Made in Cley

Mrs Ogg and I visited the pretty village of Cley-next the Sea,

Cley next the Sea

We didn’t see the sea, but we did many beautiful things.

I was very keen to visit the Pink Foot Gallery, I’d admired  from afar the work of wildlife artist Brin Edwards, and was keen to view.  There were so many beautiful things in the gallery, Mrs Ogg challenged me to chose my favourite, money no object*  what would be my take home piece. I was hard pressed to select, but Ithink it would have been one of Anthony Theakston’s ghostly owls (I’ve had the odd run in with owls before).

Over the road was Made in Cley, a wonderful place full of hand made ceramics, and  art. The shop in its self, (the yellow building, left of shot, was a delight, worn, polished floor boards and original fittings.

Cley

Like most of the shops in Cley, it came complete with a large cat perched on the counter (Flighty, there’s yet another delightful book shop too).

Around the side it had its own private railway…

Cley 2n

One more Norfolk post to come. Then I’ll head for home.

 

(*And you would need quiet a bit: it was noted there seems to be quiet a bit of disposable income sloshing about this part of Norfolk, or at least the places to spend it, the two aren’t necessarily the same.)


7 Comments

Bumbling Along.

My blog is still trapped in my visit to Norfolk,  which was a few weeks ago now, it is a very nice place to be, I might add; but it isn’t doing much in way of getting this blog back up to speed is it?.

We stayed in Holt; which  is a very pretty Georgian market town, which seems stuffed with beautiful architectural  detail, especially made of brick

Door way Holt_

 

with quirky roof lines at every turn

Sky line Holt

Can you see the  brick detail in the gable end of this next property?

 

1744 House Holt

A closer look, set in brick, the build date of 1744

1744 House Holt 2

A terraced row

Terrace row Holt_

There are some fascinating shops in Holt, the book shop wasn’t open when we were window shopping on the Sunday, however Mrs Ogg tells me it a shop frequented by Camilla.

2nd hand books Holt_

You didn’t need to go in though to imagine what it might smell like.

2nd hand books Holt 2

I’m sure Mrs Bee would have like a look at this book, I’d have loved a peek at the ilustrations.

Life of the bee book

We were very taken with the shop Old Town Outfitters, which sells clothes which are made to order, in very pared down utility sort of style, Mrs Ogg described them as  being the uniform of art lecturers and creative types; we could only press our noses at the window,  as it was the sort of place you ring the bell to be admitted. I deeply admired the pile of brown paper parcels  on the counter awaiting dispatch, even my Mum would have approved of  them and she was something of an expert at brown paper packages tied up with string. I don’t seem to have any photos of Old Town Outfitters, but this is the place to look to get a flavour, (it is a bit of a quirky website) enjoy.


1 Comment

Tender Wooden Care

Another post from my jolly into Norfolk with my friend Mrs Ogg.

We stumbled upon Rescue Wooden Boats,  at Burnham Norton; Mrs Ogg’s eye was caught by their logo, it is by one of her favourite artists James Dodds and we have curious minds so we decided to take a look.

We found a warm and knowledgeable welcome at their museum,housed in old RAF huts. I was particularly impressed by the work they have done to capture the history of the fishing community. You could spend many an hour watching their archive of films (it might take a wee while to get your ear attuned to the accent though!)

After we’d spent some time in the museum we were given a tour of the boat shed where their were several boats undergoing restoration,

Rescue wooden boats_

and many more awaiting tender loving care. Rescue wooden boats 6

But not all was history, there was a stunning looking commission being built, in the traditional style

rescue wooden boats 8

All  smooth timber, sumptuous glossy varnish *

Rescue wooden boats 2 

and  exceptional craftsmanship

rescue wooden boats 10

Glimpses could be seen, that it is was very much a place of industry

rescue wooden boats 12

The largest boat under restoration was the Lucy Lavers, a lifeboat, built in 1939 whose very first mission was to take part in the rescue operation at the Battle of Dunkirk,

rescue wooden boats 14

She and her history are to big to fit in this post,  but you can read more here.

rescue wooden boats 13

I take my hat off to all those who give their time and effort to Recue Wooden Boats. Brilliant work.

 

* The irony being I’d left Mr Uphilldowndale at home varnishing six new wooden doors, three coats each side… He’d have loved to have visited here.


4 Comments

Norfolk Fare

I forgot to include these lovely looking fruit and nuts in my last foodie post of our travels in Norfolk.

I hear it has been a spectacular year for blueberries.

norfolk blueberries_

 

And I wouldn’t have a clue what to do with a wet walnut

wet walnuts_

But I thought Hugh Fearnly-Eat-it-All might be the man to ask

Wet walnuts are a true seasonal treat, available for just a few weeks each autumn. They sound a bit messy, but don’t worry, their hard, usually slightly grubby (because unpolished) shells are quite dry – on the outside. It’s the inside that’s “wet” – still juicy and fresh, in its just-picked state. The pale blond kernels are firm but yielding, without the brittle crispness of a dried nut. And the flavour is mild, milky and sweet, with just a hint of that tannic edge that makes walnuts the sophisticate of nuts.

 

And cob nuts,  ouch £9 a punnet! By my estimation that’s about a pound a nut…

cob nuts_

Waitrose tell me they are stocking them in store this autumn and at a more thrifty price.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 342 other followers